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Ibn Battuta prepares to travel from Qaliqut [Calicut] to China but encounters a storm


2018-02-03
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Category : Ibn Batuta - India Trip

ll ended. When the time came for the voyage to China, the Sultan al-Samari equipped for us one of the thirteen junks in the port of Qaliqut. The factor on the junk was called Sulaiman of Safad, in Syria. I had made his acquaintance previously and I said to him: ‘I want a set to myself because of the slave-girls, for it is my habit never to travel without them.’ He replied: ‘The merchants from China have hired the sets for the outward and return journey. My son-in-law has one which I can give you, but it has no lavatory; (95) perhaps you may be able to exchange it for another.’ So I ordered my companions to take on board all my effects, and the male and female slaves embarked on the junk. This was on a Thursday, and I stayed on shore in order to attend the Friday prayers and join them afterwards. The malik Sunbul and Zahir al-Din also went on board with the present. Early on the Friday morning a slave-boy I had named Hilal came to me and said that the set we had [815] taken on the junk was small and unsuitable. When I spoke of this to the captain he said: ‘It cannot be helped, but if you like to transfer to the kakam there are sets of rooms on it at your choice.’ I agreed to this and gave orders accordingly to my companions, who transferred the slave-girls and effects to the kakam and were settled in it before the hour of the Friday prayer.
 Now it is usual for this sea to become stormy every day in the late afternoon, and no one can embark then. (96) The junks had already set sail, and none of them were left but the one which contained the present, another junk whose owners had decided to pass the winter at Fandarayna, and the kakam referred to. We spent the Friday night on the seashore, we unable to embark on the kakam, and those on board unable to disembark and join us. I had nothing left but a carpet to spread out. On the Saturday morning the junk and kakam were both at a distance from the port, and the junk whose owners were making for Fandarayna was driven ashore and broken in pieces. Some of those who were on board died and some escaped. In it there was a slave-girl who belonged to one of the merchants, and a favourite of his. He offered to give ten dinars in gold to anyone who would rescue her (for she had clung to a spar in the stern of the junk). A sailor from Hurmuz undertook to do it, and brought her ashore but would not take the dinars, saying: ‘I did this only (97) for the sake of God.’
 That night the sea struck the junk which carried the Sultan’s present, and all on board died. In the morning we went to the scene of their disaster; I saw Zahir ad-Din with his head smashed and his brains scattered, and the malik Sunbul had a nail driven through one of his temples and coming out at the other, and having prayed over them we buried them. I saw the infidel, the Sultan of Qaliqut, wearing a large white cloth round his waist, folded over from his navel down to his knee, and with it a small turban on his head, bare-footed, with the parasol carried by a slave over his head and a fire lit in front of him on the beach; his police officers were beating the people to prevent them from plundering what the sea cast up. In all the lands of Mulaibar, except in this one land alone, it is the custom that whenever a ship is wrecked all that is taken from it belongs to the treasury. At Qaliqut, however, it is retained [816] by its owners, and for that reason Qaliqut has become a flourishing and (98) much frequented city. When those on the kakam saw what had happened to the junk they spread their sails and went off, with all my goods and slave-boys and slave-girls on board, leaving me alone on the beach with but one slave whom I had enfranchised. When he saw what had befallen me he deserted me, and I had nothing left with me at all except the ten dinars that the jugi had given me and the carpet I had used to spread out.
(118) I.e. junk, dhow and hoa-ch’üan or trade ship. Cordier (Yule, Cathay, IV, p. 25 n. 1) suggests that kakam may be a corruption of old Italian cocca

 

ll ended. When the time came for the voyage to China, the Sultan al-Samari equipped for us one of the thirteen junks in the port of Qaliqut. The factor on the junk was called Sulaiman of Safad, in Syria. I had made his acquaintance previously and I said to him: ‘I want a set to myself because of the slave-girls, for it is my habit never to travel without them.’ He replied: ‘The merchants from China have hired the sets for the outward and return journey. My son-in-law has one which I can give you, but it has no lavatory; (95) perhaps you may be able to exchange it for another.’ So I ordered my companions to take on board all my effects, and the male and female slaves embarked on the junk. This was on a Thursday, and I stayed on shore in order to attend the Friday prayers and join them afterwards. The malik Sunbul and Zahir al-Din also went on board with the present. Early on the Friday morning a slave-boy I had named Hilal came to me and said that the set we had [815] taken on the junk was small and unsuitable. When I spoke of this to the captain he said: ‘It cannot be helped, but if you like to transfer to the kakam there are sets of rooms on it at your choice.’ I agreed to this and gave orders accordingly to my companions, who transferred the slave-girls and effects to the kakam and were settled in it before the hour of the Friday prayer.  Now it is usual for this sea to become stormy every day in the late afternoon, and no one can embark then. (96) The junks had already set sail, and none of them were left but the one which contained the present, another junk whose owners had decided to pass the winter at Fandarayna, and the kakam referred to. We spent the Friday night on the seashore, we unable to embark on the kakam, and those on board unable to disembark and join us. I had nothing left but a carpet to spread out. On the Saturday morning the junk and kakam were both at a distance from the port, and the junk whose owners were making for Fandarayna was driven ashore and broken in pieces. Some of those who were on board died and some escaped. In it there was a slave-girl who belonged to one of the merchants, and a favourite of his. He offered to give ten dinars in gold to anyone who would rescue her (for she had clung to a spar in the stern of the junk). A sailor from Hurmuz undertook to do it, and brought her ashore but would not take the dinars, saying: ‘I did this only (97) for the sake of God.’  That night the sea struck the junk which carried the Sultan’s present, and all on board died. In the morning we went to the scene of their disaster; I saw Zahir ad-Din with his head smashed and his brains scattered, and the malik Sunbul had a nail driven through one of his temples and coming out at the other, and having prayed over them we buried them. I saw the infidel, the Sultan of Qaliqut, wearing a large white cloth round his waist, folded over from his navel down to his knee, and with it a small turban on his head, bare-footed, with the parasol carried by a slave over his head and a fire lit in front of him on the beach; his police officers were beating the people to prevent them from plundering what the sea cast up. In all the lands of Mulaibar, except in this one land alone, it is the custom that whenever a ship is wrecked all that is taken from it belongs to the treasury. At Qaliqut, however, it is retained [816] by its owners, and for that reason Qaliqut has become a flourishing and (98) much frequented city. When those on the kakam saw what had happened to the junk they spread their sails and went off, with all my goods and slave-boys and slave-girls on board, leaving me alone on the beach with but one slave whom I had enfranchised. When he saw what had befallen me he deserted me, and I had nothing left with me at all except the ten dinars that the jugi had given me and the carpet I had used to spread out. (118) I.e. junk, dhow and hoa-ch’üan or trade ship. Cordier (Yule, Cathay, IV, p. 25 n. 1) suggests that kakam may be a corruption of old Italian cocca   , Electronic Village, His excellency mohammed ahmed khalifa al suwaidi, Arabic Poetry, Arabic Knowledge, arabic articles, astrology, science museum, art museum,goethe museum, alwaraq, arab poet, arabic poems, Arabic Books,Arabic Quiz, القرية الإلكترونية , محمد أحمد خليفة السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , محمد السويدي , محمد سويدي , mohammed al suwaidi, mohammed al sowaidi,mohammed suwaidi, mohammed sowaidi, mohammad alsuwaidi, mohammad alsowaidi, mohammed ahmed alsuwaidi, محمد السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , muhammed alsuwaidi,muhammed suwaidi,,

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