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Ibn Battuta and the Joki (Yoga)


2018-08-01
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Category : Ibn Batuta - India Trip

 
 
Ibn Battuta and the Joki (Yoga)
 
| #Mohamed_Ahmed_Alsowaidi_Ibn_Battota_India
Account of its Sultan. The Sultan of Quqa is an infidel called Dunkul, who used to profess submission to the king of India but was in reality a rebel.
On setting sail from this town we arrived after three days at the island of Sandabur [Goa], an island in which there are thirty-six (62) villages. It is surrounded by a gulf, the waters of which are sweet and agreeable at low tide but salt and bitter at high tide. In the centre of the island are two cities, an ancient one built by the infidels, and the other built by the Muslims when they first captured the island. In the latter there is a great cathedral mosque, resembling those of Baghdad, built by the shipowner Hasan, the father of the Sultan Jamal al-Din Muhammad of Hinawr, who will be mentioned hereafter, as well as my presence with him on the occasion of the second capture of this island, if God will. [On this occasion] we did not stop at this island when we passed by it, but anchored at a smaller one near the mainland, in which there was a temple, an orchard, and a water-tank, and on which we found one of the jugis. 
The story of this jugi. When we landed on this smaller island we found (63) there a jugi leaning against the wall of a budkhana, that is an idol-temple; he was between two of its idols and showed the traces of continuous practice of religious austerities. When we spoke to him he did not say a word, and we looked to see if there was any food with him but did not see [802] any. While we were still looking he uttered a great shout, and as he shouted a coconut fell from a coco-palm in front of him. He handed it to us and we in astonishment gave him some dinars and dirhams, which he would not accept, and when we brought him provisions he refused them also. There was a cloak of camel-hair lying on the ground in front of him; I took it in hand to examine it and he gave it to me. I had in my hand a chaplet of Zaila‘; he examined it in my hand so I gave it to him. He rubbed it between his fingers, smelt it, kissed it, and pointed first to the sky and then in the direction of Mecca. My companions did not understand his signs, but I for my part understood him to indicate that he was a Muslim who was concealing his Muslim belief from (64) the people of that island and living on those coconuts. When we were about to leave him I kissed his hand; my companions disapproved of that, but he perceived their disapproval and taking my hand kissed it and smiled and signed to us to go. So we left, I being the last of my party to go out, when he tugged at my cloak; I turned my head towards him and he gave me ten dinars. When we came out of the place my companions said to me: ‘Why did he pull you?’ and I told them that he had given me those dinars. I gave three of them to Zahir al-Din and three to Sunbul, saying to them: ‘The man is a Muslim; do you not see how he pointed to the sky to indicate that he knew God, and then to Mecca to indicate his knowledge of the Apostle (peace be upon him)? And his taking of the chaplet confirms the fact.’ They went back when I said this to them but they could not find him.
We set out again immediately and on the next day reached (65) the town of Hinawr, which is on a large inlet into which large ships enter. The town itself is half a mile from the sea. During the bushkal, which is the rainy season, this bay is so stormy and boisterous that for four months it is impossible for anyone to sail on it except for fishing.
On the day of our arrival at this place one of the Hindu jugis [803] came to me secretly and gave me six dinars saying to me: ‘The Brahman has sent this to you’, meaning the jugi to whom I had given the chaplet. When he gave me the dinars I took them from him and offered him one of them, but he declined it and withdrew. I told my companions what had happened and said to them: ‘If you wish your share of them [you may have it].’ They both refused but were full of astonishment at the ways of this person and said to me: ‘The six dinars which you gave us we left with six others between the two idols (66) in the place where we found him.’ I was greatly astonished at our adventure with this person and kept with special care those dinars that he had given me.
The people of the city of Hinawr are Shafi‘ites in doctrine, upright, religious, engaged in warfare on the sea, and mighty. They were celebrated in this respect until time brought them low after their conquest of Sandabur, which we shall relate. Amongst the devotees whom I met in this city was the shaikh Muhammad al-Naqawri, who entertained me in his hospice. He used to cook the food with his own hand, regarding it as defiled by the maidservant and the manservant. I met there also the jurist Isma‘il, the instructor in the Book of God, who was a scrupulous man of good disposition and generous nature, also the qadi there, Nur al-Din ‘Ali, and the preacher, whose name I do not remember.
The women of this town and of all these coastal districts wear no (67) sewn garments but only unsewn lengths of cloth, one end of which they gird round their waists, and drape the rest over their head and chest. They are beautiful and virtuous, and each wears a gold ring in her nose. One peculiarity amongst them is that they all know the Qur’an by heart. I saw in the town thirteen schools for girls and twenty-three for boys, a thing which I have never seen elsewhere. Its inhabitants live by maritime commerce, and have no cultivated land. The people of Mulaibar pay a fixed sum annually to Sultan Jamal al-Din, through fear of his sea-power. His army consists of about six thousand men, horse and foot.
 
_________________
Electronic Village, is pleased to launch the pilot travel series of Ibn Batuta’s Journey in India. The episodes of this 3 year (2018-2021) project are based on selected scenes from Ibn Batuta’s original travelogue and the scripts are edited and verified by the poet Mohammed Ahmed Khalifa Al Suwaidi. We request all our viewers for your valuable feedback and support for making this project a grand success.
_____________________________________________
 
عنوان النص باللغة العربية : ابن بطوطة والجوكي (اليوغا)

    Ibn Battuta and the Joki (Yoga)   | #Mohamed_Ahmed_Alsowaidi_Ibn_Battota_India Account of its Sultan. The Sultan of Quqa is an infidel called Dunkul, who used to profess submission to the king of India but was in reality a rebel. On setting sail from this town we arrived after three days at the island of Sandabur [Goa], an island in which there are thirty-six (62) villages. It is surrounded by a gulf, the waters of which are sweet and agreeable at low tide but salt and bitter at high tide. In the centre of the island are two cities, an ancient one built by the infidels, and the other built by the Muslims when they first captured the island. In the latter there is a great cathedral mosque, resembling those of Baghdad, built by the shipowner Hasan, the father of the Sultan Jamal al-Din Muhammad of Hinawr, who will be mentioned hereafter, as well as my presence with him on the occasion of the second capture of this island, if God will. [On this occasion] we did not stop at this island when we passed by it, but anchored at a smaller one near the mainland, in which there was a temple, an orchard, and a water-tank, and on which we found one of the jugis.  The story of this jugi. When we landed on this smaller island we found (63) there a jugi leaning against the wall of a budkhana, that is an idol-temple; he was between two of its idols and showed the traces of continuous practice of religious austerities. When we spoke to him he did not say a word, and we looked to see if there was any food with him but did not see [802] any. While we were still looking he uttered a great shout, and as he shouted a coconut fell from a coco-palm in front of him. He handed it to us and we in astonishment gave him some dinars and dirhams, which he would not accept, and when we brought him provisions he refused them also. There was a cloak of camel-hair lying on the ground in front of him; I took it in hand to examine it and he gave it to me. I had in my hand a chaplet of Zaila‘; he examined it in my hand so I gave it to him. He rubbed it between his fingers, smelt it, kissed it, and pointed first to the sky and then in the direction of Mecca. My companions did not understand his signs, but I for my part understood him to indicate that he was a Muslim who was concealing his Muslim belief from (64) the people of that island and living on those coconuts. When we were about to leave him I kissed his hand; my companions disapproved of that, but he perceived their disapproval and taking my hand kissed it and smiled and signed to us to go. So we left, I being the last of my party to go out, when he tugged at my cloak; I turned my head towards him and he gave me ten dinars. When we came out of the place my companions said to me: ‘Why did he pull you?’ and I told them that he had given me those dinars. I gave three of them to Zahir al-Din and three to Sunbul, saying to them: ‘The man is a Muslim; do you not see how he pointed to the sky to indicate that he knew God, and then to Mecca to indicate his knowledge of the Apostle (peace be upon him)? And his taking of the chaplet confirms the fact.’ They went back when I said this to them but they could not find him. We set out again immediately and on the next day reached (65) the town of Hinawr, which is on a large inlet into which large ships enter. The town itself is half a mile from the sea. During the bushkal, which is the rainy season, this bay is so stormy and boisterous that for four months it is impossible for anyone to sail on it except for fishing. On the day of our arrival at this place one of the Hindu jugis [803] came to me secretly and gave me six dinars saying to me: ‘The Brahman has sent this to you’, meaning the jugi to whom I had given the chaplet. When he gave me the dinars I took them from him and offered him one of them, but he declined it and withdrew. I told my companions what had happened and said to them: ‘If you wish your share of them [you may have it].’ They both refused but were full of astonishment at the ways of this person and said to me: ‘The six dinars which you gave us we left with six others between the two idols (66) in the place where we found him.’ I was greatly astonished at our adventure with this person and kept with special care those dinars that he had given me. The people of the city of Hinawr are Shafi‘ites in doctrine, upright, religious, engaged in warfare on the sea, and mighty. They were celebrated in this respect until time brought them low after their conquest of Sandabur, which we shall relate. Amongst the devotees whom I met in this city was the shaikh Muhammad al-Naqawri, who entertained me in his hospice. He used to cook the food with his own hand, regarding it as defiled by the maidservant and the manservant. I met there also the jurist Isma‘il, the instructor in the Book of God, who was a scrupulous man of good disposition and generous nature, also the qadi there, Nur al-Din ‘Ali, and the preacher, whose name I do not remember. The women of this town and of all these coastal districts wear no (67) sewn garments but only unsewn lengths of cloth, one end of which they gird round their waists, and drape the rest over their head and chest. They are beautiful and virtuous, and each wears a gold ring in her nose. One peculiarity amongst them is that they all know the Qur’an by heart. I saw in the town thirteen schools for girls and twenty-three for boys, a thing which I have never seen elsewhere. Its inhabitants live by maritime commerce, and have no cultivated land. The people of Mulaibar pay a fixed sum annually to Sultan Jamal al-Din, through fear of his sea-power. His army consists of about six thousand men, horse and foot.   _________________ Electronic Village, is pleased to launch the pilot travel series of Ibn Batuta’s Journey in India. The episodes of this 3 year (2018-2021) project are based on selected scenes from Ibn Batuta’s original travelogue and the scripts are edited and verified by the poet Mohammed Ahmed Khalifa Al Suwaidi. We request all our viewers for your valuable feedback and support for making this project a grand success. _____________________________________________   عنوان النص باللغة العربية : ابن بطوطة والجوكي (اليوغا) , Electronic Village, His excellency mohammed ahmed khalifa al suwaidi, Arabic Poetry, Arabic Knowledge, arabic articles, astrology, science museum, art museum,goethe museum, alwaraq, arab poet, arabic poems, Arabic Books,Arabic Quiz, القرية الإلكترونية , محمد أحمد خليفة السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , محمد السويدي , محمد سويدي , mohammed al suwaidi, mohammed al sowaidi,mohammed suwaidi, mohammed sowaidi, mohammad alsuwaidi, mohammad alsowaidi, mohammed ahmed alsuwaidi, محمد السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , muhammed alsuwaidi,muhammed suwaidi,,

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