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Going out on an expedition and conquest of Sandabur


2018-08-05
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Category : Ibn Batuta - India Trip

 
 
 
Account of our going out on an expedition and conquest of Sandabur
Ibn Battuta joins the Sultan of Hinawr's [Honavar] military expedition against Sandabur [Goa]
 
#Mohamed_Ahmed_Alsowaidi_Ibn_Battota_India
 
(106) Account of our going out on an expedition and conquest of Sandabur. Sultan Jamal al-Din had fitted out fifty-two vessels for an expedition to attack Sandabur [Goa]. A quarrel had broken out there between the Sultan and his son, and the latter had written to Jamal al-Din inviting him to seize the town and promising to accept Islam and marry his sister. When the ships were made ready it occurred to me to set out with them to the Holy War, so I opened the Qur’an to take an augury, and found at the top of the page: ‘In them is the name of God frequently mentioned, and verily God will aid those who aid Him. I took this as a good omen, and when the Sultan came for the afternoon prayer I said to him: ‘I wish to join the expedition.’ ‘In that case’, he replied, ‘you will be their commander.’ I related to him the incident of my augury from the Qur’an, which so delighted him that he resolved to join the expedition (107) himself, though previously he had not intended to do so. He embarked on one of the vessels, I being with him, on a [820] Saturday, and we reached Sandabur on the Monday evening. When we entered its bay, we found its inhabitants prepared for the battle, with mangonels already set up. So we spent that night near the place, and on the next morning, when the drums, trumpets and bugles were sounded, the vessels moved in to the attack, and the defenders bombarded them with the mangonels. I saw a stone hit one of the men who was standing close to the Sultan. The men on the ships jumped into the water, shields and sword in hand, and the Sultan went down into an ‘ukairi, which is like a shillir. I too jumped into the water with the rest of the men. We had with us two tartans, open at the stern, carrying horses; they are so constructed that the horseman mounts his horse inside the vessel, puts on his armour and comes out. (108) They did this and God permitted its conquest and sent down victory to the Muslims. We entered the city at the point of the sword and the greater part of the infidels took refuge in their Sultan’s palace, but when we set fire to it they came out and we seized them. The Sultan thereafter gave them quarter and restored their wives and children to them. They were about ten thousand in number and he assigned to them as residence a suburb of the town and himself occupied the palace, giving the houses in its neighbourhood to his courtiers. He gave me a Marhata (?) slave-girl called Lamki — I called her Mubaraka, and when her husband wished to ransom her I refused — and also gave me a farajiya of Egyptian manufacture which was found in the treasuries of the infidel.
Ibn Battuta re-travels the route to Qaliqut, and hears of the fate of his lost possessions (1342-3)
I stayed with him at Sandabur from the day of its capture, which was the 13th of Jumada I, until the middle of Sha‘ban; I then asked him for permission to travel and he made me promise to return to him. So I sailed (109) to Hinawr, continued thence to Fakanur, Manjarur, Hili, Jurfattan, Dahfattan, Budfattan, Fandarayna and Qaliqut — all of which places have been mentioned above — and finally to al-Shaliyat, a most beautiful town, in which the fabrics called by its name are [821] manufactured. After a long stay in this town I returned to Qaliqut. Two slaves who had been with me on the kakam arrived at Qaliqut and told me that the slave-girl who had been pregnant, and on whose account I was much upset, had died, and that the ruler of Jawa had taken the rest of my slave-girls, that my goods had been seized by various hands, and that my companions were scattered to China, Jawa and Bengal. On hearing this I returned to Hinawr and thence to Sandabur, reaching it at the end of Muharram, and I stayed there until the 2nd of Rabi‘II. 
__________________
I.e. from 15 October 1342 to mid January 1343.
Chaliyam, opposite Beypur on the south side of the river of that name. Many fabrics of different kinds were made there, and there are many kinds with names recalling the place, but their precise identity has not been established (Hobson-Jobson, s.v. Chalia, and Mzik, p. 314, n. 102).
I.e. from 24 June to 24 August 1343. These dates cannot be reconciled with his statement (below, p. 846) that he
 
عنوان النص باللغة العربية: ذكر توجهنا إلى الغزو وفتح سندابور (Goa)

      Account of our going out on an expedition and conquest of Sandabur Ibn Battuta joins the Sultan of Hinawr's [Honavar] military expedition against Sandabur [Goa]   #Mohamed_Ahmed_Alsowaidi_Ibn_Battota_India   (106) Account of our going out on an expedition and conquest of Sandabur. Sultan Jamal al-Din had fitted out fifty-two vessels for an expedition to attack Sandabur [Goa]. A quarrel had broken out there between the Sultan and his son, and the latter had written to Jamal al-Din inviting him to seize the town and promising to accept Islam and marry his sister. When the ships were made ready it occurred to me to set out with them to the Holy War, so I opened the Qur’an to take an augury, and found at the top of the page: ‘In them is the name of God frequently mentioned, and verily God will aid those who aid Him. I took this as a good omen, and when the Sultan came for the afternoon prayer I said to him: ‘I wish to join the expedition.’ ‘In that case’, he replied, ‘you will be their commander.’ I related to him the incident of my augury from the Qur’an, which so delighted him that he resolved to join the expedition (107) himself, though previously he had not intended to do so. He embarked on one of the vessels, I being with him, on a [820] Saturday, and we reached Sandabur on the Monday evening. When we entered its bay, we found its inhabitants prepared for the battle, with mangonels already set up. So we spent that night near the place, and on the next morning, when the drums, trumpets and bugles were sounded, the vessels moved in to the attack, and the defenders bombarded them with the mangonels. I saw a stone hit one of the men who was standing close to the Sultan. The men on the ships jumped into the water, shields and sword in hand, and the Sultan went down into an ‘ukairi, which is like a shillir. I too jumped into the water with the rest of the men. We had with us two tartans, open at the stern, carrying horses; they are so constructed that the horseman mounts his horse inside the vessel, puts on his armour and comes out. (108) They did this and God permitted its conquest and sent down victory to the Muslims. We entered the city at the point of the sword and the greater part of the infidels took refuge in their Sultan’s palace, but when we set fire to it they came out and we seized them. The Sultan thereafter gave them quarter and restored their wives and children to them. They were about ten thousand in number and he assigned to them as residence a suburb of the town and himself occupied the palace, giving the houses in its neighbourhood to his courtiers. He gave me a Marhata (?) slave-girl called Lamki — I called her Mubaraka, and when her husband wished to ransom her I refused — and also gave me a farajiya of Egyptian manufacture which was found in the treasuries of the infidel. Ibn Battuta re-travels the route to Qaliqut, and hears of the fate of his lost possessions (1342-3) I stayed with him at Sandabur from the day of its capture, which was the 13th of Jumada I, until the middle of Sha‘ban; I then asked him for permission to travel and he made me promise to return to him. So I sailed (109) to Hinawr, continued thence to Fakanur, Manjarur, Hili, Jurfattan, Dahfattan, Budfattan, Fandarayna and Qaliqut — all of which places have been mentioned above — and finally to al-Shaliyat, a most beautiful town, in which the fabrics called by its name are [821] manufactured. After a long stay in this town I returned to Qaliqut. Two slaves who had been with me on the kakam arrived at Qaliqut and told me that the slave-girl who had been pregnant, and on whose account I was much upset, had died, and that the ruler of Jawa had taken the rest of my slave-girls, that my goods had been seized by various hands, and that my companions were scattered to China, Jawa and Bengal. On hearing this I returned to Hinawr and thence to Sandabur, reaching it at the end of Muharram, and I stayed there until the 2nd of Rabi‘II.  __________________ I.e. from 15 October 1342 to mid January 1343. Chaliyam, opposite Beypur on the south side of the river of that name. Many fabrics of different kinds were made there, and there are many kinds with names recalling the place, but their precise identity has not been established (Hobson-Jobson, s.v. Chalia, and Mzik, p. 314, n. 102). I.e. from 24 June to 24 August 1343. These dates cannot be reconciled with his statement (below, p. 846) that he   عنوان النص باللغة العربية: ذكر توجهنا إلى الغزو وفتح سندابور (Goa) , Electronic Village, His excellency mohammed ahmed khalifa al suwaidi, Arabic Poetry, Arabic Knowledge, arabic articles, astrology, science museum, art museum,goethe museum, alwaraq, arab poet, arabic poems, Arabic Books,Arabic Quiz, القرية الإلكترونية , محمد أحمد خليفة السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , محمد السويدي , محمد سويدي , mohammed al suwaidi, mohammed al sowaidi,mohammed suwaidi, mohammed sowaidi, mohammad alsuwaidi, mohammad alsowaidi, mohammed ahmed alsuwaidi, محمد السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , muhammed alsuwaidi,muhammed suwaidi,,

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